Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Local farms’ Category

   On the way to my family’s house the other evening, I passed one of our local strawberry patches.  It came to me as the sweet perfume of sun-ripened berries wafted in the window on the balmy summer air…It’s that time of year again…

Time for shorts and flip flops, farmers markets and county fairs, fresh fruits and veggies, canning and preserving, frolicking in the garden, and chowing down on all the local goodness you can get your hands on!

Here in the valley we’re very lucky to have such a dazzling array of produce to choose from!

You can put a face and warm smile with what fills your plate, by visiting a Fruitstand or Farmer’s Market in your area….

If you prefer stalking your own goodies in their natural habitat, you can find a You-Pick Farm in your county…

A CSA is also a convenient option which supports your local farmers…

And if you’re feeling especially adventurous, you can always grow some fruits and veggies of your own…You don’t have to have 40 acres, just a few pots or old buckets on the porch will do!

Whatever you choose, you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing where your food came from and who grew it…not to mention nothing compares to the taste of fresh veggies and fruit!

Or the smell of it on the breeze for that matter…Happy foraging!

Read Full Post »

Hey Locavores!  It’s that time of year again, when the wonderful folks at Riverdance Farms, host their annual “Pick and Gather”, it’s always a wonderful time rain or shine!

We’ll see you there with our bee~luscious lemonade!  Find the up to date info on facebook @ Hey Honey! Artisanals & Riverdance Farms Pick & Gather!

Image

Read Full Post »

Here you are, the long awaited video of “our girls”, sorry for the delay.  With all the changes coming to Camp Turlock, we’ve been busy bees!  There is some exciting news we can’t wait to share with all of you, so stay tuned!

&nbsp

Shady Oak Chickens

Read Full Post »

Happy planting, harvesting and eating!

by Neal & Marie Curran

 

Spring is coming and so is our garden! Here at Nine Acre Farm, we are incredibly busy planting our spring/summer garden. Most of this work as of yet is indoors. Our plants go through quite a journey to make it from seed packet to the field. We are trying our hardest to keep conservation-intensive methods in mind even as we work indoors. We hope our process will be helpful to you as you begin your 2011 garden.

1)  A garden-ready greenhouse



Our greenhouse is small, but can fit many plants. We built tables for our plants. On two of our tables we have plastic tubing (a waste material) arched over the tables to support insulating plastic at night.  To warm the greenhouse when it’s cold and at night, we have use an old wood stove and a homemade chimney. Discarded fencing posts from the property fit perfectly in the stove. When it gets too warm in the greenhouse, the walls double as windows that lift open from the bottom.
Also, we make our own potting soil in our greenhouse. It is a mixture of homemade compost, peat, and perlite (available at most Lowes).

2)  Seed packet to greenhouse


In late December and throughout January we started plants such as broccoli, artichokes, celery, kohlrabi, beets, lettuce, leeks, brussels sprouts, and many more. Instead of using plastic trays, which aren’t always space efficient and are wasteful when they fall apart, we use soil blocks. We use the soil blocks to punch out a mold of soil. Each block mold contains 20 1-inch spaces: one for each seed. After seeding, we sprinkle our homemade potting soil over the block and water.

Currently we have begun seeding our tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. Because these members of the Nightshade family require higher germinating temperatures than our winter crops would find agreeable, we start them on soil blocks on an electric heat mat. This is an excellent way to get a jump start on summer crops!

3)  Greenhouse rotation

When our seedlings begin to grow out of their one-inch cubes, we move them to two-inch cubes made with a larger soil blocker. The two-inch blocks remain on the tables to be covered with plastic at night, just as the one-inch blocks. After a couple of weeks, we move them to our uncovered table. Here they begin the process of hardening off. The lack of plastic covering at night exposes them to lower temperatures.

4) The Cold Frame


After plants have spent a week or two on the uncovered table, they are moved to the cold frame outside our greenhouse. The cold frame is a wood frame on the ground with a tarp covering the soil. At night, the plants are covered with plexiglass (a waste material available to us). They are uncovered during the day but sheltered with sheet when it gets to warm/sunny. Plants spend about one or two weeks in here.

4) Greenhouse to field


I’m not going to talk much about this part, but I will tell you that once plants leave the nursery and go into the great adult garden, they still receive a little help. They are sheltered nightly with a light row cover. So far we have a few rows of transplants and additional direct-seeded vegetables (snap peas, carrots, turnips, beets, leaf lettuce, radishes, etc.) growing in our garden.

~ For more information about our farm or to join our CSA (starting in mid-March!) check our our website at www.nineacrefarm.com and email us at neal@nineacrefarm.com.


Read Full Post »

The Barn Cat Program is a committed group of volunteers that took it upon themselves to give feral cats a better quality of life and country dwellers a solution to pesky mice problems!

Here is their story….

Our strong agricultural community is the perfect setting to help the forgotten felines in the Central Valley.  Barn or outdoor homes are needed for spayed, nuetered  and healthy cats!

Can your farm or ranch use a good mouser?

Are you able to provide a permanent home to a homeless cat?

All that is needed is adequate shelter, food, water and the cats will do the rest!  They will repay you by keeping your rodent population to a minimum.  They are also a green solution to avoid using unhealthy pesticides and poisons.

A feral cat is often un-adoptable due to a lack of socialization. These cats are beautiful and independent but cannot continue to love among city businesses, parks, churches and alleyways.  If you believe, as we do, that killing healthy animals is not an acceptable solution, you may be interested in the Barn Cat Program!

Program Process:
Cats are placed in cages at the barn site for an adjustment period of one to two weeks.  While caged, they become familiar with the sights, sounds, and smells of their new environment.   This also allows the cats to get comfortable with their caretaker and establish this as their new home and territory.

We will provide the cages, manage the delivery and pick-up.  A transportation donation would be appreciated!

For additional information please call (209) 502-7065 and help today!  Join the  group on facebook and visit their site!

Read Full Post »

What inspires me…

Responsible farmers who not only believe in doing work that matters but also loving the work they do.

This guest post you are about to enjoy will hopefully inspire you as it has done for me:  to show up.  Written by Anna Brown, farm manager of  the organic Uplift Farms in Ceres, Ca.  She is a young woman who believes in giving back to her community and is as brilliant, authentic and adorable as her blogging words!

 

Every once in a while, we all need something that reminds us why we do what we do.  When the activities of daily life become a blur, one sight or word or experience can bring us back to center and return things to focus.

I had an experience like that last Tuesday, and it had to do with cauliflower.  Specifically, mid way through the weekly harvest in my 1/2 acre patch of winter vegetables I found the biggest and most beautiful cauliflower I have ever seen.  This variety of cauliflower usually keeps its leaves wrapped protectively around the head, but the one that caught my eye that morning had completely lowered its leaves, as if showing itself off to the world and inviting admiration.

Yet neither that cauliflower nor its neighbors down the row were perfect in the conventional sense.  Its beauty was a function not only of size and looks, but of the way of living and farming that nurtured it.

One difference between my cauliflower and it’s conventionally produced brethren is that most of mine show the traces of one insect or another, mostly caterpillars.  But I’m willing to forgive that because I grow organically and know that farming without pesticides means cultivating diversity and being willing to share space with competitors to some degree.  In fact having a crop that tolerates pest pressure without being decimated is a success!
(more…)

Read Full Post »

Visit LHF website to see their beautiful farm at….

www.lavenderhollowfam.com

Read Full Post »

Saturday, August 14th     5:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Sunday, August 15th        6:00 am to 11:00 am

If you haven’t been to this farm event here in our neck if the woods, I highly recommend checking it out!  The Double T in Stevison, CA, is an organic working dairy farm loaded with history and agricultural artifacts that are amazing.  The Double T has been hosting this wonderful farm event for many years with the support of The Ecological Farming Association, through the EFA Heartland Project and their mission is this:

The Heartland Project seeks to strengthen the future of sustainable and family farming in the San Joaquin Valley by bringing together farmers and families and encouraging a closer understanding of food production. Join EFA and other local groups for education events and fun including local music, delicious food, berry picking, and more.

So take your family and enjoy this 2 day festival that will give you the opportunity to experience blue grass music, local foods, children activities, organic dinner,  draft horse driving class and much more you will find no where else in the Central Valley!

Below are a few photos from last year…

Heartland Festival ~ Double T Acres 2009

More info here…

www.eco-farm.org & www.thedoublet.com



Read Full Post »

There is a local jewel in Clovis we want to share with you….

Trelio Restaurant, owned by brothers Chris and Michael Shackelford. The brothers work brilliantly together, Mike the talented chef and Chris the passionate Sommelier. A visit to Trelio is sure to heighten all of your senses!Trelio's brothers, Michael and Chris

The smells of wine and delicate dishes are inviting and relaxing, you can hear the sounds of wine corks popping and happy customers engaged with their Sommelier. The candlelight presents the best ambiance of the dishes and you are always sure to have Chef Michael ask how your meal was.

The real beauty of this place rests in the knowledge knowing your food comes from a hard working farmer close by, and ‘local‘ doesn’t even hint on the passion the brothers have for supporting those in the Central Valley. Their menu is seasonal, meaning what is grown in the season. It is tasty and fresh, and they are often avid shoppers at the Vineyard Farmers Market in Fresno.

Dinner at TrelioWe had the pleasure of spending some time with Chris and Michael after the restaurant closed and really came to know these gentlemen. They are genuine, funny, and very knowledgeable about what they do and what is going on around them, especially when it comes to online technologies. With a very active following on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, they remain very transparent about what happens inside their restaurant.

Have a question of your own?

Just go ahead and ask them next time you visit Trelio & tell them Anna n’ Alex sent you!

Read Full Post »

DEADLINE EXTENDED!

There have been a lot of you interested in submitting a logo for the Turlock Farmers Market so we’ve decided to extend it until this FRIDAY, February 5th!

~ Lets be simply delicious & modern with a hometown feeling ~

Logo will be voted on by a very excited Turlock Farmers Market board, winner will receive $200 and much deserved recognition for their design!

Turlock Farmers Market is coming this May, the board and committee are working diligently to bring this town a healthy, locally sourced and supported market venue for our community!

Check out Local Choices on facebook to see more market action, and while your there become a fan & add your ideas!

Please send your questions & submissions to

AnnaRiedinger@gmail.com

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: