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   On the way to my family’s house the other evening, I passed one of our local strawberry patches.  It came to me as the sweet perfume of sun-ripened berries wafted in the window on the balmy summer air…It’s that time of year again…

Time for shorts and flip flops, farmers markets and county fairs, fresh fruits and veggies, canning and preserving, frolicking in the garden, and chowing down on all the local goodness you can get your hands on!

Here in the valley we’re very lucky to have such a dazzling array of produce to choose from!

You can put a face and warm smile with what fills your plate, by visiting a Fruitstand or Farmer’s Market in your area….

If you prefer stalking your own goodies in their natural habitat, you can find a You-Pick Farm in your county…

A CSA is also a convenient option which supports your local farmers…

And if you’re feeling especially adventurous, you can always grow some fruits and veggies of your own…You don’t have to have 40 acres, just a few pots or old buckets on the porch will do!

Whatever you choose, you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing where your food came from and who grew it…not to mention nothing compares to the taste of fresh veggies and fruit!

Or the smell of it on the breeze for that matter…Happy foraging!


It’s a bee~luscious lemonade you’ll be reaching for year-round!

For the past year, our family here at Local Choices has been working hard at starting a new beverage business and getting our honey lemonade in a bottle.  It has been a dream of ours for a year, and it so exciting that we are days away from being ready to sell!
To help convince buyers to put us in stores we are leaning on our social media presence to create
demand.  If you would be so kind…please like our Facebook Page, follow us on Twitter or Pinterest.  We’ll be posting important information on the state of our precious bees, healthy local food companies, and the continuing story of Hey Honey!
Hey Honey!  Artisanal Lemonade is the only lemonade that is sweetened 100% with California wildcrafted
honey.  We will strive to support our local California and USA economy with organic lemon juice, honey, organic purees and organic extracts, we never use additives, preservatives, anything artificial or from concentrate.
We will be in a bottle soon and have secured distribution in health food stores in Santa Cruz, San Francisco and
San Rafael California.  If you live in the area keep an eye out for our lemonades this summer!
In addition to the original lemonade we’ll also have a decadent Strawberry Basil and a refreshing Lemon Lime Mint.
Thank you for supporting our family start-up!  We are looking forward to bringing you delicious
alternatives to sugary drinks and soda that you can feel good about giving to your family!
 Have a bee~utiful day….The Hey Honey! Team!

Hey Locavores!  It’s that time of year again, when the wonderful folks at Riverdance Farms, host their annual “Pick and Gather”, it’s always a wonderful time rain or shine!

We’ll see you there with our bee~luscious lemonade!  Find the up to date info on facebook @ Hey Honey! Artisanals & Riverdance Farms Pick & Gather!

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We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors,

we borrow it from our children.

– Native American Proverb

    Inspired by the free-spirited activism of the 1970’s, Gaylord Nelson and a few dedicated individuals, set out to remind us how precious and fragile are the resources we’ve been given.

    The first Earth Day was the culmination of growing environmental concerns, and the efforts of those determined to make a difference. Principles still relevant today. We have been given the wonderful gift of the earth, and with that, comes the responsibility of stewardship. How often have we forgotten the meaning of that word!

Merriam Webster’s defines Stewardship as: “The conducting, supervising, or managing of something; especially : the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one’s care”.

Wikipedia explains: “An ethic that embodies responsible planning and management of resources.  The concept of stewardship has been applied in diverse realms, including with respect to environment, economics, health, property, information, and religion, and is linked to the concept of sustainability.”

    In short, the earth and all it’s bounty, was given to each of us. To care for, love, and celebrate.  It’s easy to feel like you can’t make a difference, but the tiniest effort matters!  There are so many things we can all do to help….

    Composting, recycling, shopping locally, having your own garden (even if it’s a pot on your porch or balcony), choosing to walk or ride a bike rather than drive, cutting back on the water or electricity you use, switching to natural cleaners; it all adds up to a smaller carbon footprint and taking better care of our home.

As you celebrate April 22nd, we’d like to hear from you….

How do you show Mother Earth some love?

“Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught

will we realize we cannot eat money.”

-Cree Indian Proverb

Here you are, the long awaited video of “our girls”, sorry for the delay.  With all the changes coming to Camp Turlock, we’ve been busy bees!  There is some exciting news we can’t wait to share with all of you, so stay tuned!

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Shady Oak Chickens

I taste that the earth is treated with kindness,
I taste that animals are cared for in a humane way,
I taste that social justice is an important part of the mix,
I taste that economic viability is the foundation that helps it happen,
and all of these tastes combine to form a deeply rich satisfying experience on my pallet and in my soul.

- Kirsten Olson, farmer at Hunter Orchards

{Borrowed post from USA TODAY}

So we know dark chocolate is good for us because it has antioxidants and lamb is the new pork which was the new chicken.  Or was it beef?

But a walk through the 206,000 square feet of exhibits at this year’s Winter Fancy Food Show is a glimpse into the possible future of your grocery cart or dinner table. At this year’s show, which ended Tuesday, 17,000 attendees visited 1,300 booths to see the future of specialty food. From the aisles, here are 12 food trends for 2012:

1. Salt

Forget Morton. If it’s not Himalayan or Northwest Indian Salish-inspired, alder-smoked, it’s so 20th century. Salt’s in chocolate, on caramels, and sailing off store shelves. It’s the finishing touch to multiple dishes. At the SaltWorks in Woodinville, Wash., they sell Black Hawaiian sea salt, Bolivian Rose salt, Merlot-infused crystals and Yakima apple wood smoked sea salt. “We’ve started refining our own salt from Pacific Oceanwater at our plant near Seattle,” says the company’s Megan O’Keefe.

Salt has really gotten big in the past two years, says Ron Tanner, with the National Association for the Specialty Food Trade, which puts on the show. “We just did a salt and pepper tasting for our members,” he says. These specialty salts can run up to $8 per ounce, or $128 per pound. “Though it seems expensive, in the long run it’s not that much. You might get ten uses out of that package, so the cost per use isn’t high. And it’s a great finish to a dish.”

2. Artisan chocolate

Small producers who carefully source their cocoa beans are turning out chocolate bars that can cost as much as a mega-bag of M&M’s, but taste a lot better. These bars are often all-natural and cater to grown-up tastes. Think lemongrass, lavender-blueberry or French toast.

Standing at Poco Dolce Confections, Italian for “a little sweet,” Adam Smith points to owner Kathy Wiley’s olive oil with sea salt chocolate. “It hits just the right notes.” His Fog City News, a small San Francisco shop that sells hundreds of specialty chocolate bars, does a booming business in flavors such as Mayan chili.

The trend isn’t just in San Francisco. There are local chocolates made “in pretty much every city in the United States,” says Tanner. “People love chocolate and it’s not that hard to start producing them.”

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